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Eyebrows an open window into your emotions

By Heidi Jarecki, MD

 
Happy, surprised, melancholy? When it comes to expressing emotions brows tell it all. Eyebrows set the tone for a face and are key conveyors of mood. An appropriately positioned and shaped brow contributes to a pleasant, alert facial outlook, while a droopy or sparse brow conveys tiredness or sadness. Apart from their role in expression, eyebrow position can also influence side vision and apparent eyelid position. Sagging brows are a surprisingly common and often unappreciated cause of side vision loss.

Eyebrows accomplish their important role in conveying mood and emotion through the interplay of several muscles.

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Diabetes and the Eye

Diabetic eye disease is a leading cause of vision loss in the United States.  High blood sugar levels may also increase the risk of retinal disease, cataract and glaucoma.  A yearly dilated eye exam for patients with diabetes is the best way to prevent vision loss from diabetic eye disease.

In diabetes mellitus the body does not process and store blood sugar properly.  High blood sugar levels can cause abnormalities in the small blood vessels in the retina, the nerve layer at the back of the eye that senses light.  Normally, the blood vessels in the retina do not leak.  In diabetic eye disease, the retinal blood vessels develop leaks, allowing fluid or blood to accumulate in the retina.  Bleeding or leaking of fluid may cause retinal swelling, keeping the retina from working properly.
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Dry Eye Syndrome

It is one of the most common problems treated by eye physicians. It is usually caused by a problem with the quality or amount of the tear film that lubricates the eyes. Risk factors for developing dry eyes include: older age, certain systemic medicines, conditions of the ocular surface, and female gender.

Dry eyes can cause a gritty, sandy sensation, burning, stinging, or itching. Some people notice a sticky feeling upon waking from sleep. Occasionally, a dry eye can actually seem watery due to reflex tearing from irritation. Longstanding dry eye can lead to poor vision, redness, and altered sensation of the ocular surface.
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Myopia (Nearsightedness)

Nearsighted individuals typically have problems seeing well at a distance and are forced to wear glasses or contact lenses.  The nearsighted eye is usually longer than a normal eye, and its cornea may also be steeper.  Therefore, when light passes through the cornea and lens, it is focused in front of the retina.  This will make distant images appear blurred. There are several refractive surgery solutions available to correct nearly all levels of nearsightedness.
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Hyperopia (Farsightedness)

Farsighted individuals typically develop problems reading up close before the age of 40.  The farsighted eye is usually slightly shorter than a normal eye and may have a flatter cornea. Thus, the light of distant objects focuses behind the retina unless the natural lens can compensate fully.  Near objects require even greater focusing power to be seen clearly and therefore, blur more easily. LASIK, Refractive Lens Exchange and Contact lenses are a few of the options available to correct farsightedness.

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Astigmatism

Asymmetric steepening of the cornea or natural lens causes light to be focused unevenly, which is the main optical problem in astigmatism.  To individuals with uncorrected astigmatism, images may look blurry or shadowed.  Astigmatism can accompany any form of refractive error and is very common.
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Presbyopia

Presbyopia is a condition that typically becomes noticeable for most people around age 45.  In children and young adults, the lens inside the eye can easily focus on distant and near objects.  With age, the lens loses its ability to focus adequately.
Although presbyopia is not completely understood, it is thought that the lens and its supporting structures lose the ability to make the lens longer during close vision effort.  To compensate, affected individuals usually find that holding reading material further away makes the image clearer.  Ultimately, aids such as reading glasses are typically needed by the mid-forties.
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Ronald H. Lange, M.D.

Ronald H. Lange, M.D.

 

 

Medical Retina
Retinal Vascular Disease
Retinal Laser Treatments
Contemporary Cataract Surgery
and Presbyopic Implants

 

Dr. Ronald H. Lange was born in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. He has resided in the Chippewa Valley since 1984, when he joined the Chippewa Valley Eye Clinic.

He received his bachelor of science degree from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in biology and chemistry, and attended medical school at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Following medical school, he did an internship year at St. Josephs Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and completed his ophthalmology residency at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison, Wisconsin. After residency, Dr. Lange also completed a medical retina fellowship at the University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin.

Dr. Lange has been Board Certified in Ophthalmology since 1986
and is licensed in Wisconsin.

He is currently a member of several organizations, including:

  • American Academy of Ophthalmology
  • American Medical Association
  • State Medical Society of Wisconsin
  • Tri-County Medical Society
  • Eau Claire/Chippewa Chapter of the American Diabetes Association

Lee A. Hofer, M.D.

Lee A. Hofer, M.D.

 

 

Refractive Surgery
Comprehensive Ophthalmology
Contemporary Cataract Surgery
and Presbyopic Implants

 

Dr. Lee A. Hofer was born in Wisconsin and graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire with a degree in Biology. He earned his Medical Doctor degree at the University of Minnesota Medical School and completed his internship at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis in general medicine. Dr. Hofer did his ophthalmology residency at the University of Minnesota, Hennepin County Medical Center and the Veterans Administration Hospital in Minneapolis.

Dr. Hofer has practiced comprehensive ophthalmology in Eau Claire and Menomonie at Chippewa Valley Eye Clinic since 1988. He has been performing laser refractive surgery since 1998, Dr. Hofer founded the first laser refractive center in western Wisconsin in 2002 having performed over 15,000 laser refractive procedures. He was was among the first surgeons in the US to perform all blade free LASIK using the Intralase laser. He has participated in medical mission work in Poland where he trained surgeons in the technique of corneal transplantation.

Dr. Hofer holds medical licenses in Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, Arizona and Florida. He is a member of the AMA, a board certified member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, a member of the American College of Refractive Surgeon, a member of the International Society of Refractive Surgeons, and a member of the Wisconsin State Medical Association.

Roger S. Gray, Jr., M.D.

Roger S. Gray, Jr., M.D.

 
Comprehensive Ophthalmology
Contemporary Cataract Surgery
and Presbyopic Implants

Dr. Roger S. Gray, Jr. was born in Madison, Wisconsin. He has resided in the Chippewa Valley since 1990, when he joined Chippewa Valley Eye Clinic.

Dr. Gray received his bachelor of science degree in microbiology from the University of Wyoming in Laramie, and attended medical school at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Following medical school, he did an internship year at Waterbury Hospital in Waterbury, Connecticut, and completed his ophthalmology residency at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.

Dr. Gray has been Board Certified in Ophthalmology since 1991 and is licensed in Wisconsin. He is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Medical Association, the State Medical Society of Wisconsin, the Tri-County Medical Society, and the Wisconsin Academy of Ophthalmology.

C. Thomas Dow, M.D.

C. Thomas Dow, M.D.

 

Comprehensive Ophthalmology
Contemporary Cataract Surgery
and Presbyopic Implants

Dr. C. Thomas Dow was born in Rice Lake, Wisconsin, and has resided in the Chippewa Valley for the majority of his life. He established Chippewa Valley Eye Clinic in 1978.

Dr. Dow received his bachelor of science degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in microbiology, and attended medical school at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison. Following medical school, he did an internship year at Bronson Methodist Hospital in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and completed his ophthalmology residency at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics.

Dr. Dow has been Board Certified in Ophthalmology since 1979, is licensed in Wisconsin, and is included in the Best Doctors in America database. He has served as a member of the surgical team, Free Rural Eye Clinic, in the Philippines several times. In addition to seeing patients, Dr. Dow has research interests in infectious causes of immune disease and in telomerase in oncology and regenerative medicine.

Dr. Dow is currently a member of:

  • American Academy of Ophthalmology
  • American Medical Association
  • State Medical Society of Wisconsin
  • Wisconsin & Upper Michigan Society of Ophthalmology and
  • Tri-County Medical Society.